Wednesday, October 24, 2012

ATTRACTIVES IN KATAVI REGION












THE ATTRACTIVES IN KATAVI REGION
INRTODUCTION
In the Fiscal Year 1996/97 the Government started to implement its decision of restructuring regional administration and putting in place Local Authorities which are well performing in the way of championing development and delivering of economic and social services to the people. Hitherto (July 1997), the Local Authorities in the country are fragmented, not clear about their mission and as a matter of fact lack skilled manpower, financial resources and basic working equipment.
2.0 Thus, the government move is in the right direction, aimed at bringing closer to the people the decision making process which entails genuine participation, democracy and self governance as well as the implementation of various development programmes. This is a major shift from the traditional approach of regional focus to the current region focus planning and implementation with final goal of devolving powers to ward and village levels.
In order to ensure an effective devolution of power, the Local Authorities have to be provided with well trained and qualified staff and the necessary support needed at that level. Staffed with the competent personnel, the Local Authorities are expected as hinted above to prepare and implement their own development plans, which by and large will make use of the existing, locally available resources.
The availability of reliable, adequate, qualitative and relevant data and information at region level is a prerequite for the success of the Local Authorities in their new role of formulating, planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating their development programmes. The publication of Region Socio-Economic Profiles Series by the Planning Commission in collaboration with relevant Local Authorities should be viewed as modest attempt towards finding solutions to the existing problem of data and information gap at local levels.
The Region has only two administrative district, Mlele district and Mpanda district and through that’s district there are four local governments to work with thus Mpanda Town Council, Nsimbo Council, Mlele District Council and Mpanda District Council.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This document identifies investment opportunities available to both local and foreign investors in the priority sectors in various areas of Katavi Region. It has been prepared in the context of Vision and Mission of Katavi Region; BUILDING Katavi without poverty.
The Region’s Vision aspires to be highly competent Local Government Authority in terms of its ability to provide quality socio-economic services based on good governance principles and enabling its people use available resources to bring about their sustainable development by the year 2020.
Its mission is to facilitate and coordinate maintenance of peace, order and provision of quality socio-economic services to the communities through participation of different stakeholders, good governance in order to alleviate poverty and bring about sustainable development by the year 2020. This mission will be achieved through collaboration with the stakeholders in order to facilitate and enable the community to raise their income with the purpose of improving their living standards and increase life expectancy from 49 years in 2002 to 51 in the next ten years.
The priority areas identified for investment are mainly in agriculture, livestock keeping and beekeeping where by the specific investment potential are in Food crops, Cash crops, Vegetable farming, Beef ranching and Honey production and processing
DSC04182Katavi Region has diverse natural recourses that remain largely underdeveloped and appropriate investments will greatly contribute to economic and social progress. The Region has well developed economic, social and financial infrastructure. The region also provides a number of incentives to promote and facilitate investment
This document is divided into five chapters, the first introduces the region. The second chapter describes the social service of the region region. Development of infrastructure is covered in the fourth chapter. The fifth chapter shows the special areas for investment and provides the conclusion of the profile.
This document is available to the public in general the purpose of producing this document is to outline investment opportunities which are available in Katavi Region
The Motto of Katavi Region
Hard Working and Knowledge is a key to Peoples’ Development which lead to a creation of Katavi without poverty”.
Objectives
  • To facilitate the maintenance of peace and good governance.
  • To promote social welfare and economic well being of its people.
  • To facilitate social and economic development in its area of jurisdiction.                                         
LAND  PEOPLE CLIMATE AND AGRO ECONOMIC ZONES:
Geographical Location and Boundaries
Katavi region is one of the newly regions established by the government, it was extracted from Rukwa Region, the region lies between latitudes 50 15 to 70 03’ south of Equator and longitude 300 to 330 31 East of Greenwich. It is bordered by Urambo region  (Tabora) to the North Sikonge region (Tabora) to the East, Chunya region (Mbeya) to the East, Nkansi region (Rukwa), to the South, Sumbawanga region (Rukwa) to the South – East, Democratic Republic of Kongo DRC to the West (separated by lake Tanganyika) and Kigoma region (Kigoma) to the Northwest.
1.   2  Land Area
The region has a total area of 47,430 kms (4,430,000) of which 932,136 ha is ideal for crop production, 2,801,163.7 is under Forest reserve, 860,000ha is under Game Reserve 168,400 ha is water bodies 1,684 and the rest is used for  other activities. Hence the total land area of the Region.
Fig No.1: Distribution of area in Katavi Region in percent


1.3        Administrative units:
Administratively, the Region has six  Divisions, namely Karema, Mwese, Kabungu, Inyonga, Nsimbo and Mpimbwe: thirty three ( 33) wards namely Ikola, Ilela, Ilunde, Inyonga, Kabungu, Karema, Kasokola, Katuma, Kibaoni, Magamba, Litapunga, Ikuba, Mamba, Mbede, Machimboni, Sitalike, Itenka, Mishamo,Katavindogo, Mtapenda, Mwese, Kapalala, Majimoto, , Ugalla, Urwila, Usevya, Nsimbo, Sibwesa, Kapalamsenga, Kasansa, Nsenkwa Mwamapuli and  Utende: Two refugees settlement  namely Katumba and Mishamo; one  hundred and twenty four (124) villages and five hundred forty one (541) hamlets (Subvillages).The region has two constituents, namely Katavi East and Katavi West, twirty three elected (33) regionors and twelve (12) special seats.
Demographic characteristic
Ethnic groups
The main ethnic groups in the region are the Bende, Konongo, Fipa, Warungwa and Wanyaturu who reside in Inyonga, Karema and Mishamo. Others are Wapimbwe, Wanyarwanda, Chaga, Sukuma and Masai who inhabit Mpimbwe, Mwese, Nsimbo and Ikola. Most of these ethnic groups are predominantly agro-pastor lists. Also there are two refugees residential camp Mishamo and Katumba inhabited with Hutus from Rwanda and Burundi since 1972 due to ethnic wars.
Population size and Growth
Based on the population census reports of 1967, 1978, 1988 and 2002 Katavi region had a population   of 60,808, 146,220, 256,487 and 412,452 respectively with 3.2% growth rate. In 2010, Katavi Region had an estimated total population of 486,557 people whereby 230,429 were Males and 256,127 Females.
          CLIMATE   VEGETATION   AND TOPOGRAPHY
Katavi Region has an altitude ranging from 1000 to 2500 meters above sea level, the average temperature ranges between 26 centigrade and 30 centigrade annually. Mean annual rainfall ranges from 920mm to 1,200mm.Highlands, small mountains peaks, Mwese ranges with moderately hills, Gentle plain and plateaus, characterize the region. Lake Tanganyika  shine  with  steep hills gentle  plateau  and plains, Karema  depression  with  very  gentle  plain  and  lastly  Katumba plains  with  very  gentle  plain. The most predominant vegetation includes, tropical and savannah wooded grassland and thorny bushes.
Drainage System
The region forms the major catchments area of the three main rivers; Ugalla, Rungwa and Katuma which end up in Lake Tanganyika; (Ugalla) and the last two ends up in Lake Rukwa. Ugalla River rises up from northern highland of Katavi while Rungwa and Katuma raises Southern highland. The main streams that pour water into these rivers are Kalambasi, Wala, Uruira etc.
Agro- Economic Zones
Katavi Region has been classified into five Agro- Economic zones, namely; Katumba Plain, Mwese Highlands, Karema, Depression, Lake Rukwa valley and Lake Tanganyika. 
Katumba plain is located in Nsimbo Division with an altitude of 1000-1500m. the type of soil is sandy. Rainfall ranges between 92mm-1000mm. The main economic activities in Katumba plain are agriculture and livestock.
Mwese Highlands is located in Mwese Division with an altitude of 1100-2500m. The type of soil sandy. Rainfall ranges between 10-1100. The main economic activities are agriculture and livestock.
Another zone is Karema Depression; this is located at Kalema Division with an altitude of 1000-1300. The type of soil is sand day loam; the rainfall average is about 1200. The main economic activities are agriculture, livestock and others.
Lake Rukwa Valley is another zone in Mpimbwe Division; its elevation varies from 1000-1100 with north and 800-900 along Lake Rukwa’shores. The type of soil is sand loam with moderate good drainage main soil(inception) Its rainfall drops off toward the south, from around 1250mm per year to between 840mm-970mm in the lee of the Lyambalyamfipa escarpment. The main activities are agriculture and Livestock. Other activities are Fishing and Lumbering.
The last zone is Lake Tanganyika; this is located in Karema Division. Its altitude is 770-1300. The type of soil is sandy loam with good drainage. Main soil is Vertisol, the rainfall ranges betwween950-1200mm. The main activities are agricurture, Livestock and others (Fishing).
SOCIAL   SERVICES:
          EDUCATION   SECTOR:
   EDUCATION
Education sector in Katavi Region is among many sectors which contribute to the development of the region region. The role of education sector in the region is to improve education performance in both primary and secondary education.
The region has 172 Primary school, STD 1 pupils’ enrolments in the year 2009 was 3,473 boys and 3,492 girls making a total of 6,965 pupils.  This is an enrolment of 53%.
 OPPORTUNITIES
 Public and private investment in education has slowly increased in the last few years.  However, many opportunities still exist in the construction and operation of Schools and colleges at different levels such as primary, Secondary, High schools,
Vocational training centers, Universities etc.
    
Library Construction at Karema             Pupils at Usevya Primary School.
Secondary School
Katavi is aiming to harness and improve the skills of its people for accelerated economic growth.  This provides opportunities for the provision and expansion of industrial, vocational and technical training facilities, encouraging the use of information and communication technology.  Furthermore, the Region region is encouraging the private sector to set up specialized schools of excellence in management, engineering, finance, marketing and ICT.
 HEALTH SECTOR
Katavi Region has l hospital, 10 health Centers and 48 dispensaries which are owned by government, religious institution and private sector in general these heath facilities are evenly distributed.
The region hospital was built in 1957 formerly was a district hospital before  it was just dispensary however later on was up graded to the level of region hospital.  Since then very few new building were constructed and most of them were wards.  Thus the hospital has been using small rooms which were built purposely for nurses and doctors to attend patients as pharmacy, Laboratory and administrative activities.  Due to current health sector reform policy region hospital is required to have a modern pharmacy modern laboratory and modern administrative building which will accommodate highly   trained staffs and modern equipment.
       
Laboratory at Region hospital Katavi(Left) and Kibaoni Dispensary(Right)
 Health situation
 Facilities
With two Health Centers ,six dispensaries this has made Katumba ward to be the most well served in terms of health facilities Compared to other wards in Katavi region followed by Mishamo and Nsimbo ward respective.  On the other hand some of the ward with large number of village and population are less served with health facilities or not at all such as Ilela, Machimboni, Utende, Misunkumilo, Ilembo and Kabungu.
Table 2: HEALTH FACILITIES RATIO IN KATAVI REGION – 2008
Facility
Quantity
Region Ratio
Hospital
1
1: 40409
Hospital Bed
131
1: 3267
Rural Health Centre
8
1:75165
Dispensaries
41
1:18,791
Medical Doctors
3
1:13,469
          Source: DMO Office - Katavi.
Table 2: shows the ratio between Katavi region population and the available in comparison with Regional and National standard.  In general most of the ratios are well below the National standard and Regional ratio.
Health Personnel
It is noted in that; there is a bit shortage between the strength of the existing health facilities against the establishment.  For example there is a shortage of 159 MCHA’s (Medical child Health Assistance), 44 public Health nurses, 62 trained nurses and 43 Nurses attendance.
Other Health Indicators
 Infant Mortality Rate (IMR).
There have been some improvements in saving infant and children life comparing to the past two decades. Table 3. indicates the status of the region with regard to infant and under 5 mortality Rate.
Table 3. TREND OF IMR AND U5MR OF KATAVI REGION COMPARED TO REGINAL AND      NATIONAL AVERAGES.
Year
IMR
U 5 MR
Katavi region
National
Katavi region
National
2005
126/1000
214/1000
2008
19/1000
97/1000
Source RMO - Office Katavi.
Table 3. Above also shows that, the IMR and U5MR of Katavi region between 2005 and 2008 was lower than the Regional and the National Averages.  (But most of the cases are not reported)
 Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR)
Region statistics shows that, trend of MMR verges between 2005 and 2008 has been declining successfully.  For example MMR in 2005 was 247 and 2008 was 99. Table 4. Depicts this trend of maternal mortality by year.
Table 4: TREND OF MMR IN KATAVI REGION COMPARED TO REGINAL AND NATIONAL AVERAGES.
Katavi Region
RATE
2005
247/100,000
2006
244/100,000
2007
109/100,000
2008
99/100,000
Source - RMO – Katavi (D)
Table 5: IMMUNIZATION COVERAGE FOR 2005 AND 2008
Type of Immunization
2005 coverage %
2006
coverage %
2007
coverage %
2008 Coverage %
BCG
99.5
99.7
98.7
83
Measles
102.5
97.6
98.6
101
DPT III
96.5
82.7
90
67.7
POLIO III
94.1
84.2
90.5
67.6
TT 2
98.7
73
83
71.8
Source: RMO Office Katavi
   In general one can note in table 5: above that, 2000 immunization performance improved significantly compared to previous years (1990 and 95) BCG, and measles performance lead followed by DPT I and POLIO I
EXISTING SITUATION AND POTENTIAL AREAS FOR INVESTMENT
AGRICULTURE.
It is estimated that about 85 percent of the population in the region depend on agriculture and livestock keeping for their livelihood.  With arable land of 9,233/363 sq.Kms. Ideal for agriculture. It is anticipated that if modern crop; production and improve animal husbandry is applied; the region could increase production of both food and cash crops tremendously. The main food crops are Maize, Cassava, Millets, Paddy, Beans, S/Potatoes, I/Potatoes, Finger Millet, Bananas and Vegetables/Fruits. Cash crops are Tobacco, Groundnuts, Sunflowers, Simsim, Sugarcane, Coffee, Jatropha and Palm Oil.
                Farming Implements.

Table 6. INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES AND CLASSIFICATION OF AGRO-ECONOMIC ZONES IN KATAVI REGION.

ZONE
LOCATION
POTENTIALS
ALTITUDE
SOIL  AND RAINFALL
MAIN ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES
Katumba   plain
Nsimbo Division
1. Uruwira Irrigation scheme with 350Ha.
2.Kakese Irrigation scheme with 200Ha.
3.Ugalla Irrigation scheme with 225 Ha.
4.Mwankulu Irrigation scheme
5.Kambuzi Halt irrigation scheme with 120 Ha.
6. Bee production
1000-1500m.
Soil- sandy  loan with moderate  good drainage  Rainfall – 92mm1000mm
1. Agriculture
Maize, cassava, tobacco, beans, groundnuts, sunflower and sugar can.
2. Livestock
Cattle, sheep, goats, poultry.
Mwese Highlands
Mwese Division
1. Coffe Investment with 854 Ha.
2. Min-Ranches with 34604 cattle.
Altitude 1100-2500
Soil- sandy day warm with good drainage main soil order ultisol
(Hilly)
Rainfall- 10-1100
1.  Agriculture 
maize,   cassava beans, bananas, coffee, inshpotatis

Livestock

Cattle sheep, goats, poultry, Others, Beekeeping
Karema Depression
Karema Division
Karema Irrigation scheme with 2721  ha.
1000-1300
Soil- sandy day loam
Ferrisols
Rainfall- Annual
Rainfall averages is about 1200.

Agriculture

Maize, Cassava, paddy

Livestock

Cattle, goats, sheep, poultry

Others

Fishing & Lumbering.
Lake Rukwa
Valley
Mpimbwe
1. Mwamapuli irrigation scheme with 9647 ha.
2. Investment in Agricultural Processing Indestries(Rice milling machine and Chip body processing Machines).
3. Min-ranches with 99256 Animals.
The elevation varies from 1000-1100m with north and 800 – 900 along Lake Rukwa’s shores.
Soil-sandy loam with moderate good drainage main soil  (inception)
Rainfall. Rainfall drops off toward the south, from around 1250mm per year to between 840mm-970mm in the Lee of the Lyambalyamfipa Escarpment.

Agriculture

Maize, paddy, fruits, (Horticulture), cassava, Finger millet, sorghum.
Livestock
Cattle, Goats, sheep and poultry
Others
Fishing & Lumbering
Lake  Tanganyika
Karema
1.     Lake Shores for tourism.
2.     Fishing
770-1300
Soil- sandy loam with good drainage.

Main soil

Vertisol

Rainfall

950-1200mm

Agriculture

Maize, cassava, Palm oil, paddy

Livestock

Cattle   goats
Others
Fishing
Source: Regional Agricultural Office Katavi.
   
Nursery of Banana and Coffee found in Mwese (Investment Centres).
Irrigation Schemes.
There are five irrigation schemes potentially in Katavi Region namely Uruwira Irrigation schemes, Karema Irrigation Schemes, Mwamapuli Irrigation schemes, Ugalla Irrigation and Kakese Irrigation schemes.
  Uruwira Irrigation Scheme.



3.2        LIVESTOCK

Growth and distribution Katavi Region, is very famous for livestock keeping, due to the influx of livestock animals from other regions like Shinyanga, Tabora, Singida etc.  The region has 148,000 cattle’s. 21,600 Goats, 12,000 sheep’s and 5,750 Pigs. 

Table 7: LIVESTOCK GROWTH IN KATAVI REGION.
YEAR
CATTLE
GOATS
SHEEPS
POUTRY
PIGS
DOGS
Donkey
Duck
Bata
Horses
Camels
2005/06
2,084
8882
4,029
44,451
2,561
8,666
176
12,991
2
3
2006/07
172,678
18,173
9,565
257,337
1,755
9,891
203
15,706
-
4
2007/08
108,000
20,360
9,000
275,000
3,500
11,956
501
20,000
-
6
2008/09
148,000
21,600
12,000
375,000
5,750
21,500
360
25,000
-
-
Source: Region Agriculture and Livestock Development Officer 2009

The growth has been slowly decreasing due to education of livestock husbandry.  Through Mtowisa emphasis few animal for high outputs.  This Mtowisa programme was initiated in 1999 for the purpose of environmental conservation and to increase income to the farmers by having few animals.

TABLE 7: BOVINE DISTRIBUTION IN KATAVI REGION
Text Box: No Division/Settlement Number of Bovine
1 Nsimbo 39,960
2 Kabungu 22,200
3 Inyonga 7,400
4 Mishamo 7,400
5 Katumba 10,360
6 Karema 17,760
7 Mwese 8,880

TABLE 8: LIVESTOCK DISTRIBUTION IN KATAVI REGION BY DIVISION

DIVISION
CATTLE
GOATS
SHEEP
POULTRY
PIGS
DOGS
DONKELS
HORSES
CAMELS
Nsimbo
18,938
6,585
266
121,901
1,012
2,156
16
-
-
Mwese
8,500
2,033
112
15,090
-
931
12
-
-
Mpimbwe
82,000
26,480
7,561
40,715
213
11,079
165
-
-
Kabungu
21,100
5,927
741
39,930
340
3,000
-
-
-
Inyonga
15,000
1,015
157
8,821
-
640
-
-
-
Karema
20,000
5,000
500
15,000
-
1,400
10
-
-
TOTAL:
165,538
47,040
9,337
241,457
1,565
19,206
203
-
-
 Source: Region Agriculture and Livestock Development Officer 2008


Out of six divisions, Mpimbwe division has more livestock population than other divisions, followed by Nsimbo division and Kabungu division.

3.3        LIVESTOCK INFRASTRUCTURE

The region has three (3) Veterinary Heath Centers which are found at Mwese, Mpimbwe and Inyonga division, 11 Dips (Owned by Government), 13 abattoirs, and six Crushes 5 livestock markets, distributed in each ward as follows in Table LX below:


TABLE 9: LIVESTOCK INFRASTRUCTURE KATAVI REGION 2002
DIVISION
LV. DEV. CENTRES
VET. CLINIC
DIPS
SLAUGHTER
SLABS
PERMENENT
CRUSHES
Nsimbo
-
-
2
4
1
Mwese
1
-
4
1
1
Mpimbwe
1
-
5
3
1
Kabungu
-
-
2
3
1
Inyonga
1
-
2
1
1
Karema
-
-
1
1
-
TOTAL
3
0
16
13
5
Source - DALDO – Katavi


 

 
Animal Dip at Mwese Village (Left) and Dairy Cattle (Right).

3.4        FORESTRY

The region Region is covered by forest which is 59 % of the total area. There is forest reserve under central and local governments. Forest reserves under central government include Kabungu forest reserve sq. km 992.645, Rungwa river forest reserve sq.km 4,028.43, Msaginya forest reserve sq. km 955.6; Mlele hills forest reserves sq. km 5,210.992, Katavi north East forest reserve sq.km 5042.06, Ugalla river forest reserve sq. km 4,288.35, Inyonga forest reserve sq.km 5,906.166. The Local Government Nkamba Forest Reserve Sq.km 992.645 and Tongwe East Forest Reserve Sq.km 1684.152.

The most pressing environmental problem in the region is deforestation. The main causes of the deforestation includes shifting cultivation, uncontrolled bush fires, cutting trees for the fire wood, curing tobacco, burning bricks and producing charcoal.

          Mnyamasi falls at Tongwe Forest.

1.   6 BEEKEEPING

Beekeeping is the one of the activities conducted in the villages surrounding the forest. Traditional hives are mainly used to keep bees. The beekeepers use traditional hives prepared by them. In 2009 there were 6,200 beekeepers that 3,260 having modern hives and 344,500 traditional hives. Production of bees’ products for the year 2008/09 was as follows: - Beeswax 126800kgs and honey 431600kgs there is large areas of forest which has not been used by beekeepers.



   
Bees hives and honey Production.
1.7        TOURISM

Katavi is a region in which all opportunities rest in natural resources. Being so remote yet crammed with wildlife; Katavi is one of the greatest secrets of Tanzania. It has so many potentials on tourism such as Katavi National Park, Rukwa Game Reserve and Game Controlled Areas of Mulele, Msima, Inyonga East and West and Rungwa River which provide a home to abundance of wild animals such as eland, sable and roan antelopes. 

Furthermore, there is vast land outside the above mentioned protected areas which serves as corridors, migratory routes and dispersal areas for wildlife, and therefore important in wildlife conservation. This is the land that falls in the Wildlife Mmanagement Areas which provide a home to a rich and diverse spectrum of fauna and flora, including a wide variety of endemic species of primates (particularly chimpanzees and red collobus monkeys), antelopes, fish, reptiles, birds, amphibians,  invertebrates and plants and provide exclusive attractions for visitors favouring natural safaris.
The region has enormous game density that thrilled the visitors. Its wildernesses support Tanzania’s densest concentrations of hippo and crocodile. Visiting the wilderness of Katavi becomes more interesting and rewarding when it comes to seeing a variety of animals scattered all over the wilderness. These attractions are as follows:

  1. Katisunga Plains

Flood plains of Katisunga are the most excited experience which can be seen as you approach by air. This place is truly wild and exciting when you feel the ancient atmosphere. During the dry seasons, herds of buffaloes graze all over the plains, while several herds of elephants drink from the springs and feed on the plains and the hippos pack the seasonal rivers that passes through the plain while elands form a magnificent parade across the plains.
 
Group of elands parading across Katisunga Plains.



  1. Katuma River, and associated floodplains of Lakes of Katavi and Chada

This is the main focus for game viewing that falls within Katavi National Park. During the rainy season, these areas support a lot of wildlife including water birds and form the only source of drinking water during the dry season for miles around. The adjoining floodplains support game concentrations that defy belief. An estimated number of  4,000 elephants and several herds of buffalo are guaranteed to be seen at an instant, while an abundance of giraffe, zebra, impala and reedbuck provide easy pickings for the numerous lion prides and spotted hyena clans that surround the area. The area is a scenic beauty that provides a soothing experience to tourists!

  1. Hippo schools and crocodile caves at Ikuu and Kapapa Rivers

Katavi’s hippos provide most outstanding wildlife manifestation. Towards the end of the dry season, up to 200 individuals might flop together in Kapapa and Ikuu Rivers where there is sufficient water and the springs and pools get packed sardine-like with hippos, crocodiles and elephants. And so are the maribou storks.
Rainy season at last! A school of hippo enjoy plenty of water during the rainy season at Ikuu.
  1. Mbuga ya Duma

Cheetahs are rare mammals in the wilderness of Katavi. They can be seen in a specific area that is known as Mbuga ya duma. This provides an opportunity to the visitors to be able to see these shy but outstanding hunters that chase small herbivorous (preferably gazelles) to make a daily meal.

  1. Waterfalls

These are attractions that can be seen around Ndido and Luchima (inside Katavi National Park) as well as Chorangwa which is outside the Katavi on the Katavi-Kigoma road.


 











       



 

          Luchima waterfalls



These waterfalls occured naturally providing chiling atmosphere in the surrounding areas. For those seeking for a peaceful places for relaxation,  these are places to visit. In addition, there are few species of mammals that wonder about in these areas.



  1. Karema historical village



Karema is a historical village on the lakeshores of Tanganyika. Karema was named after Karemii town in DRC as the refugees from Karemii suffered the disease that was common in Karemii.



The village is 130 kilometers from Katavi and is rich in ancient history of the first missionaries. This is a perfect place for leisure during weekends and provides an opportunity to enjoy sea food such as dagaa and mgebuka.

A catchy for a day! Seafood is plenty in Karema
  1. The Legendary Lake Tanganyika 
Lake Tanganyika is situated within the Western Rift of the Great Rift Valley. It is the largest rift lake in Africa and the second largest lake by surface area on the continent. It is estimated to be the second largest freshwater by volume, and the second deepest lake in the world. The lake is divided between four countries Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Tanzania and Zambia, with the DRC (45%) and Tanzania (41%) possessing the majority of the lake.
Lake Tanganyika as can be seen from the satellite
The lake holds at least 250 species of cichlid fish and 150 non-cichlid species, most of which live along the shoreline thus an important biological resource for the study of speciation in evolution.
The species that are found within this Lake are highly endemic as almost all (98%) of the Tanganyikan cichlid species are exclusively native to the lake and many are prized within the aquarium trade. This kind of elevated endemism also occurs among the numerous invertebrates in the lake. From Katavi region lake is accessed through Karema and Ikola which is almost 130 kilometers. There is daily transport to and from Karema and the roads are in a good condition.
 Towards lake Tanganyika, from Karema village
The shores of lake Tanganyika covers an area of 1,828 kilometers and is famous with the crystal clear waters that provides an opportunity for the divers to enjoy the natural beauty of the life in the waters of this ancient lake. The lake shores takes about 45sg.km suitable in conducting fishing  activities.There are five Fishing villages named Karema, Ikola, Mchangani, Isengule and Kasangantongwe with 27 landing sites.
Crystal clear waters of the shores of Lake Tanganyika, a heaven for the divers!
 Other areas for fishing activities are Ugalla River covers 18 sq.Kms possible for Socio-economic investment except lake which is in Rukwa Lukwati Game reserve.
  1. Roman Catholic Missionaries in Karema (1885 to-date)

The Catholics entered the lakeshore of Tanganyika via Karema where they opened their basement in 1885. They fortified their missionaries by concrete walls that the remains can be seen. They also built church, school and hospital in Karema in the year 1885. This church is still in use and some of the remains of school are being used todate. President Mwai Kibaki (of Kenya) as well as the Arch bishop Polycarpo Cardinal Pengo are few among many popular people who schooled here. A tour to Karema Missionery provides an opportunity to see the work of the ancient Germany archtectures whose work is vividly todate. 
These strong walls of the Germany archtectures are still seen in Karema!
  1. The remains of Doctor Adrian Atmani (1866 t0 1956)
The history of Karema will not be complete if Dr. Atman will not be mentioned. This was a saintly doctor-catechist who worked for 67 years in and around Karema. He was born at Tundurma on the river Niger in Mali. He was less than ten years old when he was captured and enslaved by Tuareg raiders who sold him to an Arab in Timbuktu and ransomed for three hundred francs by a White Father who found him in a slave market in northern Algeria. He was educated in Algiers and shortly afterwards, he was sent to a medical institute in Malta to study for a diploma in medicine. In 1888 at the age of 23, he arrived in Karema and began his medical apostolate within days of his arrival at Karema. He trained nurses to help him in his Karema clinic. Atiman used western medicine, but also experimented successfully with traditional remedies. A visit to Karema will guarantee a tour to his clinic and his grave.
  MV Liemba at Lake Tanganyika
The MV Liemba is a passenger cargo ferry that runs along the eastern shore of Lake Tanganyika. It
 was built in 1913 in Germany, and was one of three vessels operated by the Germans to control Lake Tanganyika during the early part of World War 1. It was formerly known as Graf von Götzen. In 1916, the ship was dashed by the three engineers during the German retreat from the town of Kigoma
.  They decided that they would
try to enable a later recover of the ship, therefore, they loaded the ship with sand and covered all engines with thick layer of grease before sinking her carefully on July 26, off the mouth of Malagarasi River.
The ship remained on the bottom of Lake Tanganyika until 1924, when it was salvaged by the British. They found that the engines and boilers were still usable and the ship returned to service in May 1927 as a passenger and cargo ferry under the new title MV Liemba.
The vessel is now owned by the Tanzania Railway Corporation and runs between the ports of Bujumbura (Burundi), Kigoma (Tanzania) and Mpulungu (Zambia). The Liemba runs a weekly service in each direction, running from Kigoma to Mpulungu Wednesday to Friday, and back again from Friday to Sunday. There are docks at Kigoma, Mpulungu and Kasanga but at all other stops, passengers must travel to the shore by way of a smaller boat. Along the route the ferry stops at Lagosa (for Mahale Mountains National Park), Karema (for Katavi) and Kasanga for Sumbawanga. Therefore, the ferry passes Karema (Katavi) twice in a week on Thursdays and Saturdays each week. A visitor may have an opportunity to see this historical cargo ferry that is very famous in the lakeshores of Lake Tanganyika which is able to carry passenger numbers from 430 to 600.
 
Disembarking the MV Liemba
  1. Lake Rukwa
The lake is within the Great Rift Valley system and is the fourth largest lake in Tanzania located on the south-western regions of Rukwa and Mbeya covering an area of about 2650 square kilometers. The lake is shallow and alkaline in nature caused by the varying inflow of streams. Lake Rukwa has a large drainage basin in Tanzania with an area of 81,000 square kilometers. The lake does not have outflow. Rivers that are flowing in are Rungwa, Wuku, Lukwati, Kikambo, Luika, Luiche, Kavuu, Chambua, and Songwe.
The lake is rich in wildlife, largest concentration of crocodiles and hippopotamus. There are more than 350 species of birds listed in Lake Rukwa and its surroundings. Large numbers of water birds: including African skimmer, glossy ibis, lesser flamingo, spur-winged goose, and white pelican; the papyrus swamps are home to the rare shoebill stork and the Tanzania masked weaver.
.
Other tourist attractions are such as the Majimoto Hot spring and Magorofani area on the Katavi-Kigoma Road. Chimpanzees (rare and endangered mammals) are also the attractions that can be seen in the Ecosystem of Masito-Ugalla and in Tongwe Forest Reserve as well as in Wansisi mountains.
3.8 MINING
Katavi region has potential mines.  To-date, no large-scale mining activities is taking [place in the Region, most of mining activity is done by small scale miners. The following table shows some of the mineral found in Katavi Region.
Table 11. Possible Areas for Mining Investment.
TYPES
AREA
(1)   Iron
Most areas
Nickel and cobalt
Mwese
Copper, lead and Zinc
Ibindi, Ugalla, Ntumba, Magamba and Singililwa
Gold
Ibindi, Ugalla, Singililwa, Msagiya Kampuni and Katavi town
Silver
Ibind, Sikitiko and Kapalala
Rocks, stones ararel, sand and Glay
Found in all area within Katavi region
Mica (Ulanga)
Sibwesa
Genistonea and sipinal;
Karema
Moonstone
Katrema and Kapalamsenga
Garnet
Karema
Rose quarts
Usevya, Ugalla and Karema
Coal
Kanyankaa
  Source - DLNREO – Katavi
Income from minerals, in 1990 and 1995 about 612.5 of gold were extracted by small miners and earned 20,524,354,347/=. Whereas, in 1996 and 1997 a total of  Tshs 157,167,129/=  earned from gold extracted by small miners.
3.9 TOURIST ACTIVITIES AVAILABLE IN THE REGION.
Through these attractions, the region provide various activities to tourists such as:
3.9.1  Tourist Hunting
Tourist hunting is one among tourist activities practiced in this region. This type of wildlife utilization is intended for visitors who prefer to obtain animal trophies. There is a conducive environment for investment on tourist hunting and there are five hunting blocks in which tourist hunting takes place. These blocks are as follows:
i.             Inyonga E & W Hunting Block (3,500 km2) - 126 km from Katavi town.
ii.            Msima Hunting Block (2,000 km2) – 126 km from Katavi town
iii.           Mulele Hunting Block (3,000 km2) – 80 km
iv.           Rungwa River Hunting Block (1,500 km2) – 246 km
v.            Nkamba Hunting Block (977 km2) – 113 km
3.9.2  Game Viewing/Game Drive
This activity is practiced in Katavi National Park. It can also be practiced in the WMAs provided that the environment is conducive.
3.9.3  Photographic Tourism
This is practiced inside Katavi National Park as well as in the Rukwa Game Reserve. It can also be practiced in the WMAs.
3.9.4   Camping Tourism
Tourists are welcomed to camp inside Katavi National Park and provided that the environment is safe, they are allowed also to camp at the WMA where all the monies are supposed to go to the WMA concerned.
3.9.5   Walking Safaris
An opportunity to enjoy the nature through walking in the wildernesses of Katavi is guaranteed in Katavi National Park. But not only there, as it can also be practiced in the WMAs.
3.9.6   Eco-Tourism
Tourism basing on nature and ecology of the area can be done in the WMAs and around the coastal areas of Lake Tanganyika and Rukwa.
         3.9.7 Diving
This is opportunity is available in Lake Tanganyika.
3.9.7   Sports Fishing
Is also available in the shores of Lake Tanganyika.
3.9.8   Sight Seing
Can be practiced around Karema Historical Village and Majimoto Hot spring. Not only there but also around the waterfalls available in the region.
3.9.9    Ush Meals
Can be done safely in Katavi National Park and if the atmosphere is conducive, it can be practiced in WMAs.
3.9.10         Chimpanzee Sighting
This is guaranteed around Masito-Ugalla Ecosystem and around the Wansisi mountains. Here you can track and view chimps. Apart from tracking and viewing chimpanzees, one can have an opportunity of viewing other species of primates in these areas.
4.0 ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE.
4.1 ROAD NETWORK.
Katavi Region has an estimated road network length of 2056.8 kms. Out of which 621 kms are trunk roads, 634 kms are Regional roads. 668 kms are Region roads and 125.8 are Village or a feeder road.The trunk road covers 621 Kms, Regional roads 634 Kms, region Roads covers 676 Kms and Feeder Roads covers 125.8 Kms.
It is observed that 29% of the feeder road and 22% of region road are fairly bad. Lack of regular maintenance and other factors has contributed a lot towards this poor state condition of roads in the region. It is noted that the only divisions without trunk road in Mwese and Mpimbwe at the same time these two divisions do not have gravely road at all.
4.2   OTHER TRANSPORT.
4.2.1 Air Transport
The improvement of Mpanda airpot is the most attractive to investors and foreigners to invest in Katavi Region whereby the it is going to start daily route of air transport. The region has 3  airstrips located at Kashaulili, Inyonga and Karema.  These airstrips are accessed by light charter aircraft only. Inyonga and Karema are located in Katavi Region.
4.2.2  Marine Transport
The only experience of marine transport is found in Lake Tanganyika Western part of the region.  There are two ships called MV, Mwongozo and Liyemba which sail from Rwanda to Mpurugu (Zambia) Via Ikola and karema (Katavi).  Local traditional boats and canoes are used for cargo transportation and fishing activities
4.2.3 Telecommunication:
Telecommunication system in the region is fairly adequate.  The region has 567 telephone lines, 8 radio calls and 1 Postal Office distributed in the entire region.  This is shown in Table 12 below.
Table 12: TELECOMMUNICATION SERVICES IN KATAVI REGION.
Facility
Quantity
Location
Telephone line
567
All lines are located in Katavi town which comprises the following wards Kashaulili, Shanwe, Makanyagio, Kawesjense majengo and Nsemulwa
Radio calls
8
Karema, Usevya, Inyonga, Mishamo, Katumba, Mwese, Mamba and Ikola.
Postal Offices
1
Katavi town
Cell tell
4
Katavi Region
Source:  Region region Office – Katavi
4.3 BANKING
There are micro financial institutions (MFIs) in the region rendering banking services. Most of them are SACCOS. There are  SACCOS established by the people in almost every ward rendering banking services.
Postal Services
There is a post office within the region rendering postal services. There is a postal centre at Kashaulili. In other area there are agents rendering postal services.
Telephone and Communication
The region is connected with cable in some areas through TTCL. The other parts where TTCL left the gap are being bridged by TTCL competitors like TIGO, Vodacom, and Zain. Also you can enjoy internet services at postal office, TTCL office and Katavi Region headcounter
4.4    ENERGY:
Consumption of fuel wood and charcoal stand at 95% of the total energy requirement for cooking and other domestic energy requirement in Rural and urban areas in Katavi region.   This is about 4,576,200 m3 of fuel wood consumed annually in region.  Continued use of fuel wood and charcoal will have an adverse effect on the exiting forests if deforestation without a forestation will continue. In order to reverse this situation, alternative sources of energy have to be encouraged particularly biogas, solar energy, coal and electricity wherever possible. For example the use of coal from Kabaranzite has to be explored.
However the available data shows that, the consumption of alternative source of power particularly thermal power electricity in the region has increased.  This increase could be attributed among other things, for instance electric cost is becoming somehow low comparing to other source as the days goes.  Table 40 shows demand of electricity in the region
Table 13: Electricity Demand and Supply in Katavi region between 2007- 2010
Year
Installed capacity( available)
Demand Megawatt
Source
2007
1656                   1450
1100
Thermal power
2008
1656                       1450
1500
2009
1656                       1450
1750
2010
2312                       1900
2000
Source:  Tanesco – Katavi, 2009
                                  
5.0 SPECIAL AREAS FOR INVESTMENT
Wildlife provides plenty of investment opportunities in this Region. Considering the fact that wildlife conservation areas are remotely located, management and utilization of wildlife requires the following investments in order for the visitors to be able to enjoy the attractions that the region offers:
5.1                                                Transportation
The key fact to the development of tourism is travel. It is the intention of the Government of Tanzania to open-up the southern part of the country for tourism investment by putting up the required infrastructure and development of the tourism products. Being so rich in wildlife, Katavi region is set for a bright future if the transport system improves.
Rapid and efficient transport system by air, road and rail will reduce the travel fatigue to and from the wilderness of Katavi region. Investors, therefore have the opportunity to invest in the provision of air charter services to the southern and western Tanzania, luxury road transport services to all wildlife protected areas. Currently, there are no air transport to and from the region. Road transport from Katavi to Tabora, to Kigoma, to Mbeya is not realiable and some of them are seasonal. Rail transport is also not reliable.
5.2                                                Accomodation and Catering
It should be noted that the standard of catering  in hotels can sometimes make or break a holiday. Different types of accomodation and catering facilities are needed to cater for different needs of different visitors. The Region is in need of hotels, guesthouses, restaurants, cafes and fast food outlets.
5.3                                                Visitor use facilities (e.g. tented camps, campsites e.t.c)
The ecotourism industry requires the provision of permanent or semi-permanent visitor use facilities. In order to conserve the natural environment, visitor use facilities in wildlife areas must blend with the surroundings. 
Due to ecological limitations for building up visitors use facilities in protected areas, visitors can be accommodated in camps/lodges that are situated in the vicinity to access attractions in Katavi National Park and Rukwa/Lukwati Game Reserve. Therefore, this calls for the investors to invest on the Wildlife Management Areas of UBENDE and MPIMBWE.
There is also an opportunity to invest on high profile water sports, aimed at diversifying the tourism products of Lake Tanganyika and Rukwa in order to attract visitors to spend more nights in the area.
5.4                                                Foodstuff production and supply for hotel catering
Katavi region has fertile soils for agriculture and livestock keeping but production of quality meat, fruit, and vegetables is still very low as well as storage facilities is poor. If the growth of the tourism industry, coupled with commercial preservation of food items for catering in lodges, hotels and camps, could go side by side with promotion of local production, there could be improved tourist consumables, which would greatly contribute to poverty alleviation in the region. However, growth of both tourism and agricultural sectors require investments in infrastructure that link rural, urban and protected areas.
Why insisting to invest in Katavi region 
Accessibility and transport infrastructure interms of:
  • Airways
  • Railways
  • Roads and Water ways
Location
Geographical location of Katavi Region and neighboring countries such as Democratic Republic of Congo, Zambia, Burundi and Malawi favors the Region when comes  to investment
Investment support Policy
The Investment Policy of the country is an attractive for economic projects for sustainable development of rural communities. “There is no doubt that Katavi Region is a very good example of collaboration with investorsthe government makes everything possible for investors’ convenience
Though the Regions were neglected in terms of road construction; virgins land for agricultural product, raw materials and Industries, “From now on the Region set up new industrial centers, actively implement state of the art technologies from scratch” and utilize the available of land, as well as skilled and unskilled labour.
However, in education sector we have secondary school in each ward of Katavi Region, what is needed now is to improve secondary education by providing with facilities and establish ‘A’ levels as well as Colleges in order to increase more professionals to expand Adult and Complementary Basic Education and make it more functional so that its recipients apply it in undertaking their productive activities.
Proactive Philosophy for Investors Support
In Katavi Region there is no long procedures when it comes to investors support, the Administrators give support to facilitate the process of investment. Thus people are encouraged to invest in Mineral sector, Tourism, Agriculture, Fisheries, Solar Energy, Industries and Hydroelectric. The rural community should be encouraged to substitute use of hydropower with other sources of energy for example Biomass and Renewable energy sources.
6.0        CONCLUSION
Given a conducive environment, wildlife could be utilized in infinity, thus contributing to the national and peoples’ economy. Tanzania’s tourism industry is largely wildlife based. This implies that wildlife protected areas have to be maintained, developed, and promoted, parallel to marketing of the tourism products. Furthermore, wildlife outside protected area network should also be protected and adequately managed.
Therefore, in order to capitalize on tourism, Katavi Region needs to continue protecting its wilderness. Areas outside the core protected areas that are potential for wildlife should be adequately conserved and managed.
In one hand, Agriculture is the leading economic sector in Katavi, providing a livelihood to 85% of the population subsisting on less than two hectares. It is the primary source of food and raw materials accounting for not quite half of the GDP and a leading export sector. It remains critical for achieving sustained growth, poverty reduction and rural development. Smallholder farmers responsible for 90% of all farm produce underutilize arable land, as production systems remain archaic in tillage, storage and processing.
On other hand, In Fisheries the Region put into efficient use available resources in order to increase fish production so as to improve fish availability in the rural areas
Also promote small scale, semi intensive aquaculture system with simple technologies and low capital investment and encourage formation of rural fishery associations and groups for easy provision of extension services, building awareness and for pooling resources for investment
However, Katavi Region promotes the involvement of the rural fisher communities in the planning, development, management of fishery resources and develops rural markets for fisheries through the private sector.
Willy Sumia, Katavi
0715 519988//0784 519988//0767519989

 

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